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  • Principles and Best Practices

    What we believe More

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    OHA award and grant opportunities More

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Chinese and Spanish Translations of the OHA’s Principles and Best Practices Now Available!

The Principles and Best Practices Documents are now available in Spanish and Chinese! The documents are linked in the Principle and Best Practices suite of documents: https://www.oralhistory.org/principles-and-best-practices-revised-2018/.

Thank you to Denise Amparan, Administrative Assistant, and Vianey Alejandra Zavala, Manager of the University of Texas at El Paso Institute of Oral History, for completing the Spanish translation of the documents:

http://www.oralhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/OHA-Best-Practices-Translation-to-Spanish-2020.pdf

Thank you to Lili Wang (North China Electric Power University), Xiaofan Liu and Chenxi Gu ( Communication University of China) for completing the Chinese translation of the documents. And thank you to Bin Liu (North China Electric Power University) and Xiaoyan Li (Cui Yongyuan Center for Oral History, Communication University of China) for editing the translation:

http://www.oralhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/OHA-Principles-and-Best-Practices-Chinese-revised.pdf 

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Wanted! A New OHA Treasurer

The Oral History Association is searching for a new Treasurer.

Job Duties include:

Collaboratively with the Executive Office, the Treasurer will help create an annual budget for the OHA. The Treasurer will render an opinion about various practical financial matters, for example, the choice of tax accountants and various bank programs. The treasurer will have signing ability on all checking, saving and investment accounts. The Treasurer will ensure that GAP accounting principles and other good financial practices are used by the Executive Office. Once a year, the Treasurer shall review the records of the Executive Office, the investments and investment policies of the board, and the annual financial review of the association, and shall report to the Council on these matters. 

The Treasurer is appointed for a 6-year term and is approved by the Council, upon nomination by the President. The Treasurer may be appointed for a second term, upon approval by the Council.

Requirements: 

The Treasurer must be a member in good standing in the organization and is considered an ex-officio member of the Council. The Treasurer will also serve as the chair of the Finance Committee. The Treasurer should have accounting experience in some capacity that is directly applicable to overseeing the OHA’s finances.

Payment: 

  1. $2000/year, payable quarterly upon receipt of an invoice
  2. Reimbursement of all OHA related expenses, e.g. office supplies, phone charges, etc.
  3. Reimbursement of travel expenses to the Annual Meeting

Please send a letter of interest and a resume to oha@oralhistory.org. Position is open until filled.

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OHA Statement on the Killing of George Floyd and Solidarity with Black Lives Matter

June 5, 2020

On May 25, 2020, George Floyd was killed by a member of the Minneapolis Police Department. Following Mr. Floyd’s death, protests and calls for change and an end to police brutality have risen throughout the United States and internationally. The Oral History Association stands in solidarity with the family of Mr. Floyd, Black Lives Matter, protestors, and communities of color, and we echo this call for change. The killing of George Floyd is not an isolated incident, but another event in a long history of state violence and brutality toward people of color in the United States—a history that predates our country itself.

Institutionalized white supremacy is a disturbingly prominent part of American history, placing barriers to economic, social, and educational equality and creating a criminal justice system which is deeply punitive towards Black Americans. Further, militarized police actions that threaten a free press and freedom of assembly have worked to create a terrible legacy of violence and suppression towards those working to change this country.

As oral historians, we understand that through the stories of people—citizens and activists—we can confront oppression and work to create an equitable and just society. In our commitment to diversity, inclusivity, and respect, and to a historical record that documents the experiences of unheard and marginalized voices, we must listen to and amplify the demands of people and communities of color. We must continue to document and expose the injustice so many have suffered for centuries, and develop new projects to expand these efforts.

In this work, it is essential we adopt anti-racist methods and practices. Further, we can and must work to address institutional racism in our institutions and our field, through developing and supporting leaders of color, providing anti-oppression training, and continually working to center the voices and experiences of those most directly impacted by oppression. People of color, whether they be colleagues, narrators, students, or patrons, must be supported and valued. Historical knowledge around police brutality and systemic racism is essential to addressing both, but Black and Brown people must have a clear, equal, and respected role in developing this knowledge.  

Many of our members have dedicated their careers to documenting stories of democratic citizen action and how these efforts can enact change. We have a responsibility to understand and celebrate these successful efforts, and to engage in this work ourselves. There are a number of ways we can support current protests and calls for justice: register to vote, sign petitions, support protestors or participate in protests ourselves, donate to groups and funds working to end police violence and systemic racism, call our legislators, and educate ourselves.

As Black Americans and those acting in allyship in our communities, states, and country engage in difficult and transformative work to end police violence and racism, work that will continue long after the current moment, we are committed to supporting them and participating, now and in the future. Black Lives Matter.

The following organizations have endorsed this statement:

Baylor University Institute for Oral History
Columbia University Oral History Master of Arts Program and
Columbia Center for Oral History Research
Oral History Archives at Columbia
Oral History in the Mid-Atlantic (OHMAR)
Texas Oral History Association (TOHA)
UNT Oral History Program
UW-Madison Oral History Program

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COVID- 19 Updates for OHA

Conference Update from the OHA President (6-25-2020)

Update from the OHA President (5-15-2020)

Letter from the OHA President (4-10-2020)


The OHA Office is working Remotely (3-20-2020):

Starting Monday, March 20 the OHA’s Executive Office will be working remotely.

Please bear with us during this time as our responses to any inquiries may be slowed down. We will not have access to our office phone, though we will be able to check and return voicemails. We ask that people please contact us through email, oha@oralhistory.org, as that will be our most reliable method of communication.

Thank you!
OHA Staff


OHR Update: Resuming Book Reviews (6-25-2020):

Books are available again for review (http://oralhistoryreview.org/books/), though through summer 2020, the OHR will mail books to reviewers twice a month, so expect some delays in receiving books.

OHR Update: Pause on Book Reviews (3-19-2020):

Update from the Staff at the Oral History Review:

The Oral History Review is not able to mail books out for review at this time because our offices at the Science History Institute are closed during the pandemic. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

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Highlight: OHA 2019 Diversity Scholarship Award Winner- Anahí Naranjo

Anahí Naranjo Jara is an environmental justice advocate and storyteller from Quito, Ecuador. Anahí is using oral history to highlight the resilience of communities on the frontlines of environmental and social injustices historically silenced in dominant discourses.  Her Pachamama Oral History Project “aims to elevate and center agrarian indigenous individuals in the Ecuadorian Andes to highlight the impact of climate change on the physical and cultural landscape of the region.”

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