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Bicentennial Throwback Thursday…1976

Follow our weekly series, Throwback Thursday, designed to help celebrate 50 years of OHA. We’ll profile a year in the life of the organization each week with photos, logos, and highlights taken from the Oral History Association Newsletter. We welcome your memories, photos, and comments at oha@gsu.edu.

OHA in 1976…

Alice Hoffman, Penn State, first woman President of OHA

President: Alice Hoffman, Pennsylvania State University
Site of the Annual Colloquium: outside Ottawa, Canada
Newsletter: Tom Charlton, editor; Adelaide Darling, Judy Edquist, and Margaret Miller, associate editors
Editorial office: Baylor University, Waco, Texas
Annual individual membership: $10

Highlights of the year from the Oral History Association Newsletter…

  • The OHA and the Canadian Oral History Association jointly co-sponsored the annual Colloquium at the Chateau Montebello outside of Ottawa. 1976 was Canada’s Olympic year, American’s Bicentennial year, and International Oral History Year.
  • The first meeting of Oral History in the Mid-Atlantic Region (OHMAR) was held in May, 1976.
  • An oral history of the U.S. Congress was announced, sponsored by Former Members of Congress, Inc., an organization of 450 men and women who have served in the House and Senate. Charles T. Morrisey served as procedural consultant and an interviewer.
  • The American Jewish Committee completed a two-year project involving 250 Holocaust survivors living in the U.S. Louis B. Cowan of Columbia University directed the project entitled “A Study in American Pluralism Through Oral Histories of Holocaust Survivors.”

Who we were interviewing…

  • New York University…formed the American Left project to record the experiences of veterans of radicalism in labor, politics, and culture
  • Program of Oral History at the National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City…eyewitnesses of events in the sound movie industry in Mexico since 1930
  • The French government’s first oral history project…bureaucrats, union officers, doctors, and employers connected with social security.
  • Radcliffe College, Cambridge, received a grant to support an oral history project on the lives “older black women in entertainment, writing, social work, and government who began their careers prior to the 1930s.”

Check back next week for 1977…

 

 

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Throwback Thursday…1975 (is that an OHA sweatshirt?)

Follow our weekly series, Throwback Thursday, designed to help celebrate 50 years of OHA. We’ll profile a year in the life of the organization each week with photos, logos, and highlights taken from the Oral History Association Newsletter. We welcome your memories, photos, and comments at oha@gsu.edu.

OHA in 1975…

Left to right: Joel Gardner and Bernard Galm of UCLA, outgoing Newsletter editors. Note the OHA sweatshirt…

President: Samuel Proctor, University of Florida
Site of the Annual Colloquium: Asheville, North Carolina
Newsletter: Tom Charlton, editor
Editorial office moves to Baylor University, Waco, Texas
Annual individual membership: Increased to $10

Highlights of 1975 from the Oral History Association Newsletter

  • OHA Council appoints Ron Marcello as Executive Secretary of OHA, combining the offices of Secretary and Treasurer and locating them at North Texas State University in Denton, Texas.
  • OHA members asked to review revisions to the organizations Goals and Guidelines, the precursor to today’s Principles and Best Practices, for a vote at the 1976 annual meeting.
  • The buzz word of the year was “Bicentennial” as organizations across the county delved into oral history projects preparing for 1976.

Who were we interviewing in 1975?

  • Martha Ross, lecturer in oral history at the University of Maryland–those connected to the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service since its establishment by the National Labor Relations Act of 1947 (Taft-Hartley)
  • UCLA Oral History Program — the Los Angeles art community including Karl Benjamin, John McLaughlin, and Fred Hammersley
  • Gerontological Society — early leaders in the field representing fields ranging from cell biology to the psychology of human development
  • Imperial War Museum, London — the life and work of the lower deck of the Royal Navy from 1900 to 1930, including recruiting, training, mess room life, discipline, and customs and traditions

Check back next week for highlights from 1976…

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Deadline for OHA award nominations extended to May 1

The submission deadline for annual OHA awards marking achievement in the use of oral history has been extended. Submissions for the Book Award, Article Award, Elizabeth B. Mason Project Award, Oral History in a Nonprint Format Award, and the Postsecondary Teaching Award will be due by Sunday, May 1.  The deadline for the Stetson Kennedy Vox Populi award, created to honor individuals and organizations for using oral history to create a more humane and just world, is May 15. For more information, see Awards.

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OHA in ’74…Throwback Thursday

Follow our weekly series, Throwback Thursday, designed to help celebrate 50 years of OHA. We’ll profile a year in the life of the organization each week with photos, logos, and highlights taken from the Oral History Association Newsletter. We welcome your memories, photos, and comments at oha@gsu.edu.

OHA in 1974…

Attendees at the 1974 Colloquium were stranded when the bus to the airport broke down.

President: Charles Crawford, Memphis State University
Site of the Annual Colloquium: Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming
Newsletter: Bernard Galm, Editor; Joel Gardner, Associate Editor
Editorial office located at University of California, Los Angeles
Annual individual membership: $7.50

Highlights of the year from the OHA newsletter…

  • Several key institutions in the oral history world were formally established in 1974–Britain’s Oral History Society, the Canadian Aural/Oral History Association, and the Southern Oral History Program at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.
  • Sovietologists from Europe and America, the news media, and scholars gathered at Columbia University in April to hear excerpts from 180 hours of tapes of former Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev given to the Columbia Oral History Collection by Time, Inc. The meeting room at Columbia contained “As much Sovietology as is likely to get crammed into a seminar room” according to host Louis Starr.
  • The Appalachian Oral History Project entered its fourth year of interviewing people on life in southern Appalachia from schoolteachers and miners to grocers and politicians. The project, supported by four local colleges, had received over $90,000 of grant funding to date and added a photographer and journalist to the staff.
  • Oral historians who attended the ninth annual OHA Colloquium at Grant Teton National Park had to be an intrepid bunch. According to the newsletter, there was a problem with Frontier airlines, the Friday and Saturday keynote speakers cancelled, and the bus back to the airport from the national park broke down with about 50 attendees on board.  “There’s really no other way to put it: even the driver deserted it after a feeble attempt to motivate its sputtering engine. The good fellowship and unselfishness of some passing drivers salvaged a potentially unwieldy situation and turned it into just another anecdote for OHA annals.”
  • The “fiercest debate of the colloquium” according to OHA Newsletter editor came during the discussion of a resolution on the future of the Nixon tapes and transcripts which was summarized in the newsletter by OHA Secretary Ron Marcello. Several resolutions were brought up for a vote but did not pass. The discussion was broadened to include recommendations that would apply to all presidential papers. At the end of the discussion, members voted to print the various resolutions in the newsletter so that all members could study and consider the issue in the future.

Who we were interviewing…

  • Oral History Project of Rhode Island — textile industry workers
  • Sierra Club — past Presidents and a companion who hiked with John Muir
  • Chinatown Oral History Project of New York — elderly immigrants who were deeply involved with evolution of Chinatown
  • Utah Historical Society — labor, rural life, and the Pony Express

Check back next week for highlights of 1975…

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International Committee Blog

European Social Sciences History Conference – 30 March – 2 April, 2016 – Valencia, Spain

This conference continued the high caliber of organization and paper content that has become the hallmark of this conference.  Unofficial statistics for the Oral History Network reveal:  79 papers were accepted; 21 were rejected; 63 were published in the conference programme.  This is similar to the number in Berlin 2004 with 68; Amsterdam in 2006 with 61; Lisbon in 2008 with 66 and Vienna in 2014 with 64.

Leslie McCartney presented a paper on the reuse of archival recordings done by scientists in the 1970s and 2000s along with current recordings of residents’ observations of sea ice changes in the Chukchi Sea, making the point that existing oral history recordings residing archives and as collected today are very useful for scientists and local residents to discuss a changing climate.  All of the interviews and supplementary documentation are available on www.jukebox.uaf.edu/seaice.

Miroslav Vaněk presented there a his paper concluding general thoughts about developments of oral history on international ground, which were realized between two International Committee of Historical Sciences (ICHS) Congresses, San Francisco 1975 and Jinan 2015. Pavel Mücke tried to present the first research outputs from recent project of Oral History Center, Institute for Contemporary History (Prague) aimed to the oral history and contemporary history of traveling and tourism in Czechoslovakia before 1989. Their impression from Valencia were generally positive, a congress was organized very well and on high standard as it became usual on ESSHC platform, however they reflected some changes and shifts in also very well organized Oral History Network. A longtime co-chair Graham Smith (U.K.) passed his position to newly elected member, Malin Thor Tureby (Sweden), which will be co-chairing a next network sessions on Belfast ESSHC 2018 congress with chairs on duty, Andrea Strutz (Austria) and Anne Heimo (Finland). Because of limited space for Oral History Network in conference program (around 60-65 presenters in maximum) and a consequent non-accepting of several proposals before ESSHC 2014 congress held in Vienna, a lot of participants applied their papers for Valencia to other networks, which caused a considerably radical change in auditoriums, now much younger (with many Ph.D. students) and with full of first time presenters.

On a whole, the conference was very positively was perceived and evaluated at an Social Event with refreshments, co-organized by Graham Smith and David Beorlegui (Spain), which was held in Terra-Centre Social Club and visited by the majority of Oral History Network participants.

 

Upcoming International Summer School of Oral History in Prauge – September 5 – 13, 2016

Instructors will include Rob Perks (UK), Alexander von Plato (Germany), David King Dunaway (USA), Monika Vrzgulová (Slovakia), Miroslav Vaněk (Czech Republic), Pavel Mücke (Czech Republic) and other teachers from our Department of Oral History – Contemporary History.

Registration due by April 30, 2016

For more information http://ohsd.fhs.cuni.cz/OHSD-70.html

International Scholarship Applications Now Open

Applications to the Oral History Association Annual Meeting Scholarships can be found at http://www.oralhistory.org/annual-meeting-scholarships/.

XIXth International Oral History Conference, June 27-July 1, 2016, Bangalore, India

If you are planning to attend this conference, the following website has details on the conference scheduled, scholarships, registration, visas, accommodation and more: http://iohaconference2016.org/.

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Throwback Thursday…OHA in ’73

Follow our weekly series, Throwback Thursday, designed to help celebrate 50 years of OHA. We’ll profile a year in the life of the organization each week with photos, logos, and highlights taken from the Oral History Association Newsletter. We welcome your memories, photos, and comments at oha@gsu.edu.

OHA in 1973…

President: John E. Wickman, Director of Eisenhower Library, Abilene, Kansas
Site of the Annual Colloquium: West Point, New York
Newsletter: Bernard Galm, Editor; Joel Gardner, Associate Editor
Editorial office located at University of California, Los Angeles
Annual individual membership: $7.50

Highlights of the year from the OHA Newsletter:

  • The NEH awarded the Claremont Colleges a grant of $41,955 to record “the history of blacks and Chicanos in Southern California.” The plan calls for “about 30 black and Chicano students to conduct taped interviews with old-timers and leaders of both ethnic groups.” The project included training on interview techniques and sessions on how to examine family records and other documents.
  • The international scope of oral history “has been greatly widened over the past few years, spreading from its American foundations to nearly all parts of the world.” OHA President Wickman took three weeks of his vacation time to go on a lecture tour to Glasgow, Edinburgh, Leicester, and Turku in Finland, giving lectures to students and faculty where he found “from this firsthand contact, an intense interest in oral history.”
  • Oral history in Canada gained a foothold with projects at University of British Columbia and McGill University in Montreal. Subjects include the role of women, the labor movement, and the history of Canadian invention and technology.
  • Interviewers from the South Dakota Oral History project recorded more than 250 interviews after a devastating flood hit the Black Hills in the summer of 1972. More than 230 lives were lost in the state’s greatest natural disaster. The interview team used a controlled sampling of city residents so that a cross section of socioeconomic groups were interviewed.

Cars awash after massive flooding in South Dakota.

Who were we interviewing?

  • Vincennes Library, Indiana — Indiana residents about experiences of the Great Depression.
  • The American Nurses Foundation — Past Presidents of the association discussion health care and nursing practice in the state.
  • University of Missouri-St. Louis — strikers participating in the four-week teachers’ strike, the first in city history.
  • Foxfire magazine staff of rural Georgia students — spreading their prototype for folklore projects to eleven other students groups thanks to a $196,000 Ford Foundation grant.

Click 1973 OHA Newsletter to get a sneak peak at the front page of the Oral History Association newsletter, Volume II, Number 1, March 1973

Check back next week for news of 1974…

 

 

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Education Committee Blog

As an oral history educator, I always emphasize student self-reflection.  I always task my history students at Harford Community College to share their thoughts on how the oral history process impacted them personally and affected their perceptions of the history the narrator discusses.   In this self-reflection video clip, a recent student (Amber Turkin) reflects on the interview she conducted and the ways in which her oral history experience enhanced her understanding of our class on the 1960s.  Amber’s self-reflection demonstrates the power of oral history to make the past meaningful and relevant for students:

URL: http://harfordvoices.org/2014/09/24/student-reflections-amber-turkin/

Amber’s self-reflection is posted on the Harford Voices oral history digital exhibition.

 

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