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OHA’s Response to the Violent Attacks Against Asian Americans

March 22, 2021

In light of the recent violent attacks against the Asian American community, the OHA has done several things to support our friends and neighbors. We have signed onto a statement with fellow professional societies affiliated with the American Council of Learned Societies, decrying the violence. You can find the statement here: https://acls.org/ACLS-News/ACLS-News/March-2021/ACLS-Statement-Condemning-Anti-Asian-Violence. The Council has also gathered together resources that we might rely on as we stand firm against racial injustice pitted toward Asian and Pacific Islander communities. They include:

You can also:

If you have other resources you think we should include, please contact the Executive Office at gro.y1618928354rotsi1618928354hlaro1618928354@aho1618928354. We will continue to post everything we receive on this page.

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Anti-Oppression and Oral History Spring Workshop Series

The Oral History Association is proud to partner with the Columbia Oral History Master of Arts Program to co-sponsor a spring workshop series on Anti-Oppression and Oral History. This series will consist of five virtual workshops and is a continued collaboration from the Summer 2020 Anti-Oppression Workshop Series.

“Oral history has a strong tradition as a progressive practice, focused on amplifying marginalized voices not typically given powerful platforms to speak in public. Oral historians have documented the stories of struggles for justice around the world, and at times have participated in those struggles. At the same time, as a field oral history has excluded Indigenous people and practices from the legitimacy we have so laboriously built. Leadership in our organizations and institutions has been predominantly white, even while people of color have played key roles and invested their time and energy in building these institutions.

In this series, we share visions for oral history in which people of color – their knowledge, skills, practices and voices – are at the center of our practice. This is not a diversity approach, in which our field remains white-led but invites some people of color in. It is an anti-oppression approach, in which we reorient our work to challenge structural oppression actively, expecting that that will change our work and our field in deep ways. We invite you to learn, grow, imagine and be challenged.”

Find more information here: http://oralhistory.columbia.edu/blog-posts/People/anti-oppression-and-oral-history-spring-workshop-series.

The workshops will be free to everyone, with a sliding-scale suggested donation so instructors can be fairly paid.

Series at a Glance

March 20th, 2021, 1:00 – 4:00 PM
Placing the Narrator at the Center: Design Co-Created Oral History Projects
Nairy AbdElShafy

April 23rd, 2021, 3:00 – 5:00 PM
Oral History: A Working Praxis of Critical Care and Relationship-Building Pt. 1
Crystal Mun-Hye Baik 백문혜

April 30th, 2021, 3:00 – 5:00 PM
Oral History: A Working Praxis of Critical Care and Relationship-Building Pt. 2
Crystal Mun-Hye Baik 백문혜

May 13th, 2021, 2:00 – 3:30 PM
A Public Interview with Brent Stonefish
conducted by Francine D. Spang-Willis

May 27th, 2021, 1:00 – 4:00 PM
Equity Budgeting: Budgets for Economic Justice
Sarah Dziedzic and Jess Lamar Reece Holler

*All times are listed in Eastern Standard Time

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OHA 2021 Elections, Call for Nominations

OHA Nominations Committee
2021 OHA Elections
Call for Nominations

Deadline: March 22, 2021

Dear OHA members,

We are inviting you to help us move the organization forward towards its strategic goals and focus on social justice, by submitting statements of interest or recommendations (for self or another) for three (3) OHA leadership positions commencing October, 2021:

  • OHA President Elect (1 seat) to be elected for a one-year term (2021-2022) and a three-year commitment.
  • OHA Council (2 seats) to be elected for a three-year term (2021-2024).

The nominations committee enthusiastically embraces opening the process for broader inclusion and diversity and acknowledgement of the oral history community.

OHA is led by a group of volunteers who serve as officers, Council members, and committee members. See OHA Operations Manual for more detailed description of the roles and responsibilities of OHA officers and council members. https://www.oralhistory.org/about/association-business/

Under-represented members are especially welcome, as per the OHA Statement on Diversity and Inclusivity: https://www.oralhistory.org/about/oha-statement-on-diversity-and-inclusivity/

The Committee will review all statements of interest and recommendations and select two candidates for each position to bring to the membership for election. Statements of interest and recommendations must include; name, contact information, and a paragraph summarizing the nominee’s qualifications and vision. All candidates need to become OHA members following their official nomination.

Please submit using this form:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSegggHb7H3smlJla1YUwleyRiZfDdLDsMh92EvW5A7MHtr3Yg/viewform?usp=sf_link.

OHA Nomination Committee Co-Chairs

Nicki Pombier & Nishani Frazier
Email: moc.l1618928354iamg@1618928354reibm1618928354opikc1618928354in1618928354

2020-2021 Nomination Committee Members

David Cline
Sharon Utakis
Tara White
Winona Wheeler
Tomas Summers Sandoval, OHA Council Liaison

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Co-Executive Directors’ Report

By Kristine McCusker
February 2021 Newsletter

We hope that, during in the difficulties of a pandemic and political and economic uncertainty, you are surviving.

The OHA is navigating the perils of the pandemic well, thanks to the hard work of Council, volunteers and our intrepid Program Associate Faith Bagley. We are busy planning #OHA2021 and are pursuing positive approaches to holding a meeting in a time of pandemic. We are still monitoring the situation, preparing for the possibility of another virtual meeting, and will know more soon. Once we know for certain, we will send an email to the membership.

In the meantime, we are finding new opportunities to promote the organization:

  • This year, we will conduct two oral history trainings for regional library systems in Tennessee.
  • Thanks to support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, we are publishing online our most compelling 2020 conference sessions. They will be available by the end of February and will be open to the public.
  • Maggie Rivas-Rodriguez will be conducting an OHA-sponsored workshop on Latinx oral histories for the Organization of American Historians on April 15 from noon-1:30 p.m. EST. Special thanks to Virginia Espino for organizing this session. Pre-registration with OAH is required.

We are also helping Troy Reeves, the OHA’s new treasurer, ease into his job. He has already been a stellar support, providing good observations and wry asides as we make finance and insurance decisions. He also enjoys horrifying us southerners with horror stories of snowy Wisconsin.

We are in the process of setting up new financial systems (e.g. making Paypal a payment option) that will make it easier for our members.

As always, if there’s anything the OHA can do, please let us know. Until we hear from you then, best–or at least better–for 2021.

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President’s Column

By Dan Kerr
February 2021 Newsletter

The Oral History Association’s Vision Statement: We envision a world where a deep humanistic understanding of the past, developed through a process of listening and mutual respect, shapes a more inclusive and equitable future.

The waning days of the Trump administration posed unprecedented challenges for the United States as a whole as well as for the Oral History Association. On Jan. 6 a mob of Trump supporters sought to overthrow our democratic form of governance, displaying symbols of hate while claiming to be patriots.

Less than two weeks later, the Trump administration issued the “The 1776 Report,” which attacked a half century of historical scholarship, called for a form of government indoctrination of American students and provided ideological justification for the failed coup.  The OHA joined with dozens of other academic associations to sign onto statements issued by the American Historical Association denouncing both of these developments (January 6th Statement and 1776 Statement).

In considering OHA’s position on these statements, OHA Council and the Executive Office realized we need to make more transparent the process we have in place for making quick decisions on the issuance of public statements. Our OHA Policy on Public Resolutions states that ultimate authority to approve public statements rests with OHA Council.  However, the language that follows assumes a lengthy process linked to our Annual Business Meeting.  We hope to clarify this process with additional language that will be presented to the OHA membership this year that delineates how decisions are made outside of our annual meeting.

At any time, members can reach out to the Executive office or any Council member seeking support for public statements on issues that impact our field. If Council does not support intervention, members will have recourse to bring their proposal before our membership using the process laid out in the existing OHA Policy on Public Resolutions.

The Committee Restructuring Task Force, which seeks to realign committees so that we can more effectively push our strategic plan forward, has proposed that OHA develop a model where members can self-organize into officially recognized caucuses.

Such caucuses would provide a means for members to affect the direction of the OHA from the bottom up. Now is a great time to start thinking of the caucuses that you would like to form or be a part of.  Other ideas that are being considered include the formation of a Development Committee and Advocacy Committee.  If you have any suggestions for the task force to consider, please reach out to the Executive Office and these ideas will be considered by the task force.

After a lengthy search, the OHA now has a new treasurer, Troy Reeves.  He will chair the Finance Committee, advise the OHA on all budgetary matters and be a non-voting participant in our monthly Council meetings.  In anticipation that a Development Committee will be formally established this year, we have formed a Development Task Force that is chaired by Stephen Sloan. Troy Reeves and I will work closely with this task force as we seek to institute regular and standardized development practices within the OHA.

This work is critical as we begin the first stages of planning the transition of our Executive Office.  Council approved the formation of an Executive Office Search Committee that will include Kelly Navies, LuAnn Jones and Zaheer Ali. We expect the OHA will issue a Request for Proposals by early summer.  Please seriously consider pitching your own proposal to serve as OHA’s next Executive Director.

It is never too late to get involved with one of the OHA committees or task forces that are essential for advancing OHA’s mission.  If you would like to get more involved, please send a note to gro.y1618928354rotsi1618928354hlaro1618928354@aho1618928354.

 

 

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OHA’s 2021 Annual Meeting is Virtual!

“Moving Stories”
October 2021 (Exact Dates To Be Determined)

The OHA’s Call for Proposals for the 2021 Annual Meeting is now closed.

We are writing to announce that the 2021 Annual Meeting of the Oral History Association will be virtual. Of course we mourn the opportunity to meet in person as a large group, to eat and drink and explore a new place together, but we are excited by the opportunity to plan a virtual meeting from the ground up.

Changing how we meet forces us to really think about what our meetings are for and how we structure them – we are not going to try to recreate the immersive intensity of an in-person conference, but make the most of the potential of meeting online. For example, while we all know that listening to someone read a paper in person can be less-than-engaging, on Zoom it can be even less so. We are offering a bunch of new interactive formats for sessions, from Birds of a Feather Caucuses where you can convene a conversation among attendees who share an identity or experience, to sessions for workshopping pre-circulated works in progress and satellite gatherings, where we invite you to host a socially-distanced in-person local meet-up to share a meal, take a walk, or watch a session together. We also expect that the conference may be spread over a longer period of time in October, exact dates TBD.

We anticipate that meeting virtually will make the gathering accessible to more people – we are investing in live captioning and interpretation, and hoping to welcome many newcomers who have been excluded from past meetings due to travel costs and other barriers.

We know that there may be people who can only now imagine participating in this gathering, knowing it will be virtual. For that reason we have extended the deadline on the Call for Proposals to April 1. You can find extensive instructions and tips on submitting here.

We want to hear your visions for the conference, and invite you to participate in making it happen. Here is a form to share ideas and concerns, which includes an opportunity to volunteer to join our organizing team.

So, please share this CFP widely – this is the perfect opportunity to invite friends, colleagues and neighbors into the OHA without asking them to buy a plane ticket!

Sincerely,

Amy Starecheski, OHA Vice President
Sara Sinclair and Nikki Yeboah, Program Committee Co-Chairs

PS – And we are now scheduled to meet in Cincinnati in 2024! It will 100% be worth the wait.

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OHA 2021 Annual Meeting Update

We are already hard at work (and having fun!) planning the 2021 Annual Meeting. We expect that the submission portal will open by February 1 and we will have a March 1 application deadline. In the meantime, everything you need to know to develop your proposals, including a bunch of exciting new session formats, should be here!

“Moving Stories”

The Oral History Association invites proposals for papers and presentations for its 2021 annual meeting to be held October 13-17, 2021.

For this conference, we invite you to reflect on the idea of movement in expansive terms from the geographical to the technological to the political. In 2020 we saw sudden and massive shifts in how we move physically around the world. Many of us moved much less. At the same time, we saw rapid changes in social and cultural life and an effervescence of social movements.

Oral History has become an international movement in historical research. Our practice has long been used to document the movement(s) of people and of ideas. And at the heart of our work, we are midwives to meaning making in the processes of remembering. We move memories from the past to the present to promote their reverberations in the future then back again; embracing the cyclicality, disruptions, and constructions of time.

The 2021 conference highlights the many ways that oral history moves stories, ideas and memories. The Program Committee is interested in proposals that consider how stories move through generations, communities, and geographies; what stories get told about periods of movement, transition and stillness; stories of migration and transition across time, space, bodies, and difference; how the movement of memory shapes the stories groups of people tell about themselves; the movement of oral history across disciplines, mediums, identities, borders, and cultures; and how oral history utilizes the movement of narratives towards transformative social change. We are also interested in how oral history is used to document these movements.

In its indigenous origin, oral history has long been understood as an embodied practice: as memory transmitted from one body to another. The Program Committee is interested in proposals that consider how our field might expand understanding of our work to include digital bodies. How might we reframe our interviews to include a virtual meeting of two bodies? How might we use the virtual realm in our encounters with narrators to access different kinds of memories? What are the ethical and political stakes of live vs virtual encounters?

Conversely, how can we access more physical expressions of memory beyond the colonial archive? What might an embodied archive that encourages alternative forms of engagement with the stories we collect look like? How might we shift and reimagine new modalities that move the conversation into the public forum and back into the hands of the communities from which they emerge? These questions speak to a broad intersection of subject areas, from gentrification to migration studies, queer studies, postcolonial theory, disability studies to performance studies. However, the Program Committee welcomes broad and creative interpretations of the conference theme!

The conference was originally planned to take place in Cincinnati, Ohio. We cannot yet determine if it will be possible for us to gather in Cincinnati in some way, but what we do know is that this will be a conference with significant remote elements. We do, however, invite proposals for local in-person “satellite” gatherings around the world, whether for social and networking events, conference watch parties, or in-person sessions. Please see appendix below for a list of next year’s conference session formats.

We invite you to consider innovative ways to deliver engaging and interactive online and in-person events. Sessions that involve movement through real or virtual space: walk-and-roll-arounds, dine-ins, audio guided runs, virtual cook-ins, skill-shares, performances, and network meet-ups are some of the possibilities that we envision but we look forward to the expansion of our vision by all of your creative submissions.

In addition, we welcome proposals from the various communities that carry out oral history work – academics, independent scholars, activists, librarians, museum curators, web designers, teachers, community historians, documentary film producers, artists, creative writers, ethnographers, public historians, and others whose work relates to this year’s conference theme. As the field of oral history itself has moved and transformed over the years, we invite submissions from those who are taking it in new directions, forging new paths, and questioning old ones. We invite critiques of the field and forays into its futurity. Where are we going and how do we get there?

We hope to have a significant international presence at the meeting and particularly welcome proposals that highlight oral history work outside the United States. If accepted, international presenters may apply for registration waivers, made available by the OHA in support of international presentations. Registration waivers are also available for accepted presenters and others who attend the meeting.

OHA 2021 Session Formats: In the spirit of movement and transformation, this year’s session formats promote new ways of disseminating the stories we collect and share. Participants are welcome to select how they would like to use the conference space from the options below.

Birds of a Feather

Birds of a Feather (BOF) involves groups of people with a common interest or area of expertise informally working together. Program committee can suggest BOF groups for attendees to join and we also welcome proposals for BOF groups. The informal sessions take place without a pre-planned agenda and are designed to encourage discussion and networking. Proposals for BOF groups should have a facilitator, and ideally two.

Campfire

Campfire Sessions begin with a speaker (or multiple speakers) at the front of the room presenting an idea to a group of people. After 15 or 20 minutes, however, the focus shifts from the presenter to the audience. For the remainder of the session, the presenter becomes a facilitator, inviting comments, insights, and questions from those around the room. Campfire sessions allow attendees to drive their own learning and share experiences with others, which also assists with networking.  

 Listening Session

1-3 presenters share longer excerpts from their interviews (up to 30 minutes of audio total), and then generate a conversation with the audience.  This is a chance for audiences and researchers to discuss the ethical, interpretive, or pragmatic issues that arise in the interviews and for researchers to get feedback on their interviewing method, or to engage in shared interpretation with colleagues of thorny or complex issues.

Mini-workshop

1-2 workshops leaders share knowledge and expertise about a particular oral history tool, technology, technique lesson plan, or software in a short “how to” session.

Panel 

3-4 speakers present papers, 10-20 minutes each, followed by discussion. Includes a chair and may include a commentator.

Papers in Progress

Attendees sign up in advance to read each other’s work in advance of the conference and come together to workshop pieces in progress during the session.  Proposals should have a chair, and may include participants who have already agreed to be part of the session, or can be open for participants to sign up once the program is announced.

Personal Introspective

In these sessions, attendees privately reflect on their answers to a set of questions. All attendees write their answers down. They then have an opportunity, but not an obligation, to share their answers with the group. It is a useful format to use towards the end of the conference to help reinforce learning and solidify commitments to make changes based on their experiences at the gathe. Proposals should have a facilitator, and ideally two.

Performance/Storytelling

An aesthetic, narrative or artistic production involving one or more persons. Includes a chair and may include a commentator.

Roundtable

3-6 speakers make 5-10 minute introductory remarks and engage in a discussion with each other and the audience.

Satellites

Proposals for local in-person gatherings around the world, whether for social and networking events, conference watch parties, or in-person sessions.

The Solution Room

The Solution Room is designed to provide peer-supported advice on attendees’ most pressing challenges. Proposals should outline a particular challenge to be discussed. Participants are divided into break-out groups of 6-8.  People with “challenges” circle through the break-out rooms to present their problem and have it brainstormed by the group in 7-minute cycles. A note-taker in each “room” keeps a record which can be shared at the end of the session. Proposals should have a facilitator, and ideally two.

Submission Deadline: The submission portal will open by February 1 and the application deadline will be March 1.

Proposal Queries may be directed to:

Nikki Yeboah, 2021 Program Co-chair (San Jose State University, ude.u1618928354sjs@h1618928354aobey1618928354.ikki1618928354n1618928354)
Sara Sinclair, 2021 Program Co-chair (Columbia University, ude.a1618928354ibmul1618928354oc@53161892835422ses1618928354)
Amy Starecheski, OHA Vice President (Columbia Oral History MA Program, ude.a1618928354ibmul1618928354oc@931618928354saa1618928354)

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OHA Upcoming Webinars

January 28: Protect the Value of  Your Labor: Survival Skills for Freelancing in Oral History

 Coming January 28, 2021, from 1:00 until 2:30 EST: Protect The Value Of Your Labor: Survival Skills for Freelancing in Oral History. Led by Liz Strong.

Working in oral history is fraught with requests for unpaid work, tight budgets for ambitious projects, and clients who don’t understand oral history ethics. As the title of this webinar suggests, one of the greatest challenges of working in oral history is protecting the value of our labor. Communicating and coordinating with other oral historians is the strongest way to work toward better wages and work environments for all of us.

The webinar is free to all OHA members, and $75 for non-members.

Sign up here: https://oha.memberclicks.net/webinar-protect-the-value-labor.

Want to know more about Liz Strong? Check out her bio here: https://incite.columbia.edu/liz-strong

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Co-Executive Directors’ Column

By Kristine McCusker

We want to thank everyone who made the Oral History Association’s first virtual conference such a stunning success. We were grateful to the Program Committee, especially chairs Shanna Farrell and Kelly Navies, for organizing such a robust program. We also loved the virtual visit to Baltimore, thanks to the Local Arrangements chairs, Linda Shopes and Catherine Mayfield. Dan Kerr oversaw the entire process, and Allison Tracy-Taylor continued the Council’s strong support of these plans. Anna Kaplan was a tremendous help before, during and after the event, helping the Executive Office design and manage the conference, and the intrepid Faith Bagley made sure there were so few glitches in the execution of the conference.

As a follow-up to the conference, we are also reaching out to conference panelists to publish some of the conference sessions as a sort of virtual conference proceedings. This will be funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities CARES Act grant we received. Stay tuned for more information. In the meantime, did you miss a panel? If you registered for the conference, you can still access conference sessions through the Attendify app.

The obvious question, now, is what about next year? The answer is: we don’t know. There is still so much uncertainty because the situation with covid changes so rapidly. As we learn more, we will make sure to update the membership via the monthly News Blasts and via newsletters. Know that we are carefully watching the situation and planning strategically for any eventuality.

The end of the year is coming, so please update your memberships and help keep the OHA moving forward into 2021. Stay safe and best wishes for the end of the year.

 

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President’s Letter

By Daniel Kerr

The year 2020 has been a year of crisis, trauma and resilience. In his introduction to the edited collection, Listening on the Edge: Oral History in the Aftermath of Crisis (2014), Mark Cave leads off with a statement that feels more true now than ever before, “Crisis is a historical constant.” He continues, “Our thoughts are consumed by daily routine or captured by the next headline. What remains when the cameras turn away, and reporters go home, are individuals and communities in the process of redefinition.” Cave makes a compelling case that oral history as a methodology is well suited to explore this longer-term process of change.

That could not be truer today. With that said, the speed, pace and magnitude of crisis in 2020 have not only left communities in a state of redefinition, they have left our very practice and the Oral History Association itself in a transformed state. The OHA is in the midst of a major change, as we seek to expand our relevance and impact and further our mission and vision as articulated in our newly adopted Strategic Plan:

Mission Statement: The Oral History Association (OHA) is a dynamic crossroads of ideas and people, connecting and inspiring practitioners, and supporting their work to ethically collect, preserve, share, and interpret memories which foster knowledge and respect.
Vision Statement: We envision a world where a deep humanistic understanding of the past, developed through a process of listening and mutual respect, shapes a more inclusive and equitable future.

In our commitment to gather together in the midst of this pandemic, the OHA pulled together one of our most successful conferences to date with a near record number of attendees and presenters. The conference theme, The Quest for Democracy: One Hundred Years of Struggle, could not be timelier. We heard repeatedly from the post-conference survey that the sessions were profound, impactful and field altering. Nearly every one of the sessions has been recorded and transcribed, creating unprecedented levels of access to all of the presentations. Those sessions will be available through Attendify through next summer.

We had huge numbers of volunteers who attended the conference for free and did a tremendous amount of work to host and edit transcriptions. Significant numbers of presenters followed our new guidelines on making PowerPoints and other visuals accessible. Almost every session had a live transcript and our feature sessions had live American Sign Language translation. We embraced our commitment to making the OHA broadly accessible and impactful.
While we remain dedicated to holding in-person gatherings in the future, we will need to be creative to find ways to use new tools to continue our commitment to making our gatherings as accessible as possible. With that said, our virtual success depended on the strong relationships we have built with one another over the years of gathering in person. While our avatars in Second Life may dance better, dancing together in real life requires much deeper levels of engagement.

Planning for annual conferences starts nearly three years prior to the meeting and begins in earnest a year and a half prior to our coming together. We are already well underway with our plans for 2021. Vice President Amy Starecheski, program co-chairs Nikki Yeboah and Sara Sinclair, and local arrangements co-chairs Gwen Etter-Lewis and Tracy McDonough are busy pulling together what promises to be an extraordinary conference focusing on the theme Moving Stories. It is time to work on your proposals and organize your sessions. At this moment, it is our preference not to hold an in-person conference. However, we need to work with the hotel that we have contracted with in Cincinnati to create an acceptable solution for both sides before we can make a final decision on the meeting format.
At the October business meeting, we passed our new Strategic Plan. Tomás Summers Sandoval Jr., Allison Tracy-Taylor and Cynthia Tobar are leading the Organizational Restructuring Task Force to look closely at our committee structure to see how we might organize the OHA most effectively to further the goals of the plan. We ask all of our current committee members to participate in this process, and we expect to start implementing these changes by March and formalizing them in the Constitution and Bylaws at our annual meeting next year.
We have a lot of heavy lifting to do to achieve our goals and would value your active participation. Please let us know if you are interested in participating in our current committees. We will find a place for you as our committee structure changes: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeSx8eNi2htvRQ0RgTq-ZKrSAOb–LJjekMLv5vpFlvUP2KFQ/viewform?usp=sf_link.

In January, we will move into our fourth year of a five-year contract with Middle Tennessee State University, which houses our executive office. Kris McCusker and Louis Kyriakoudes, our co-executive directors, have done a tremendous job and have dedicated countless hours of time to the OHA. Understandably, they have both decided that they want to focus on other projects after their five-year commitment ends. With their support, we will begin a search for a new Executive Office next year. We expect to put out a Request for Proposals in the late spring or early summer of next year. Until then, start thinking about whether you may be interested in being the OHA’s next executive director.

Immediately, we have a critical need for a new treasurer. Kristine Navarro-McElhaney, to whom the OHA will be forever indebted, resigned as treasurer because she now serves as the vice-president and president-elect for the National Council of Public History. Please consider applying to be the treasurer. The six-year position receives an annual stipend of $2,000 and is reimbursed for travel expenses to the annual meetings. Let us know right now if you are interested: https://www.oralhistory.org/2020/11/11/wanted-a-new-oha-treasurer/

As the planet around us is in the midst of great turmoil and change, we cannot stand by as spectators. Oral history, rooted in deep listening, empathy and open-endedness, is needed now more than ever. Grab your microphones, recorders, metadata synchronizing tools and editing software, and let’s get to work building a better world!

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