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OHA 2020 Local Workshops

The Oral History Association (OHA), a national professional organization that supports best practices in oral history, is offering two virtual oral history workshops for those living or working in Maryland. The OHA’s 2020 Annual Meeting had been slated for Baltimore, and although due to the impacts of COVID-19 the meeting will now be virtual, the association is committed to supporting oral history in the region and is excited to offer the following interactive workshops online:

Introduction to Oral History – Saturday October 3, 9am-1:30pm ET; Sunday, October 4, 3:30-6:45pm ET

Oral History in the Classroom – Saturday, October 17, 10am-1pm ET


Introduction to Oral History

Conducted virtually via Zoom
Saturday October 3, 9am-1:30pm ET
Sunday, October 4, 3:30-6:45pm ET
Cost: $15
Led by Anna F. Kaplan, PhD, and Maggie Lemere

Overview:

The Introduction to Oral History Workshop, taking place online October 3 and 4, will introduce attendees to oral history approaches. Mirroring the oral history process, five workshop sessions will offer best practices and practical advice from project design to interviewing to making interviews accessible and putting them to use. Central to these workshops is engaging in oral history as a collaborative practice with communities and individuals seeking to document, preserve, and share their experiences. This workshop is directed at those in the region interested in developing an oral history project of their family, community, church, organization, or other purpose, as well as librarians, archivists, and others who work with oral histories or want to learn more about the oral history process. Registrants sign up for the entire workshop, and are welcome to attend all of the sessions or a selection of them as they’d like.

Please Note: Registration is limited to 25 to encourage discussion with the facilitators in a small-group format. In an effort to support oral history training in and around Baltimore, our virtual host city, registration priority will be given to Maryland residents. If space is still available, registration will open more broadly on September 21.

Schedule:

Saturday, October 3

9-10:30am – Planning an Oral History Project: Turn your oral history project idea into action with this session on what to think about and how to plan an oral history project that builds in flexibility through the entire process.

10:45am-12:15pm – Conducting an Interview: Explore how to ask open-ended and follow-up questions that elicit descriptive stories, memories, and reflections. This session will also discuss approaches and techniques for navigating difficult situations that might arise in an interview.

12:30-1:30pm – Technology: Learn about the different types of technology you can use for in-person or remote interviewing. We will discuss the considerations for making technology choices in order to meet your project’s goals and budget. You’ll also gain tips on recording and transferring your interviews from one medium to another.

Sunday, October 4

3:30-5pm – Preserving Interviews & Making Them Accessible: How do we care for oral history recordings after the interview? Dive into best practices and tips for preserving interviews and making them accessible, from institutional to at-home archives.

5:15-6:45pm – Putting Interviews to Use: Imagine the possibilities for facilitating the public’s engagement with your oral histories, from books to podcasts, sound installations, and beyond.

Workshop Facilitators:

Anna F. Kaplan, PhD, is an independent historian and oral historian who teaches oral history workshops with the DC Oral History Collaborative and is an adjunct history professor in Washington, DC. Her research examines the role of memory in issues of race in the US South.

Maggie Lemere is a filmmaker, oral historian, and master naturalist who has worked globally to cultivate connection and social and environmental justice through storytelling.

Registration

Registration for the entire Introduction to Oral History Workshop is $15. For an additional $35 (total of $50), registrants will also have full participation in the OHA Annual Meeting, October 19-24. Regular OHA Annual Meeting registration is $75.

Register Here: oha.memberclicks.net/local-workshop-intro-to-oral-history

To register, you will have to either sign in or create an account on MemberClicks. Creating an account does not mean you are signing up to be a member of the organization, and you will only ever receive communications regarding the events for which you register.


Oral History in the Classroom

Conducted virtually via Zoom
Saturday October 17, 10am-1pm
Cost: $15
Led by David Armenti and James Karmel, PhD, with panelists including Debbie Ardemendo, JP Bennett, and David M. Jahnke

Overview

The Oral History in the Classroom workshop, taking place online October 17, is intended for educators who are interested in using oral history with their students. Educators at all levels will find the workshop useful, though particular attention will be paid to secondary education. The workshop has two parts: 1) an overview of the oral history process, and 2) a panel discussion featuring educators with extensive experience using oral history with middle and high school students.

Please Note: Registration is limited to 25 to encourage discussion with the facilitators in a small-group format. In an effort to support oral history training in and around Baltimore, our virtual host city, registration priority will be given to Maryland residents. If space is still available, registration will open more broadly on September 21.

Schedule

Saturday, October 17

10:00 – 11:30 AM, Overview of Oral History Projects with Students – Facilitators will discuss the rationale and process for doing oral history with students. Components will include developing a project vision, finding project partners, setting up and conducting interviews, technology considerations, conducting remote interviews, and post-interview processing and availability of interviews, as well as using existing oral history collections within the classroom.

11:45 AM – 1:00 PM, Panel Discussion: Conducting Oral History Projects with Students – The moderated discussion will include educators who have extensive experience working with high school and middle school students. Panelists will discuss how to incorporate students of various grade levels for interview collection and study, as well as how such projects support curricular requirements while also promoting community engagement and active learning.

Workshop Facilitators and Panelists

Debbie Ardemendo is currently the Associate Director of Education at the Apollo Theater in New York City, where she oversees the development of programming and resources for the classroom including for school tours, performing arts workshops, school partnerships, oral history residencies, and professional learning workshops for educators. Prior to her 11 years with the Apollo Theater, Ms. Ardemendo was a museum educator at The Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum and Manager of School Programming at the Museum of the City of New York.  She received her Bachelor of Arts from Goddard College in Plainfield, Vermont, and her Master of Science in Education from Bank Street College for Education in New York City.

David Armenti is a museum educator and historian, with expertise in American social movements. As Director of Education at the Maryland Historical Society, he uses oral history collections to develop instructional resources and professional development opportunities for K-12 students, teachers, and university audiences.

JP Bennett is an 8th Grade English and Social Studies teacher at Monarch Academy Glen Burnie, a public charter school in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Over the past eight years, he has led five oral history projects, in which students learn about local civil rights activism and then collaborate with a small group of peers to interview community members who participated in the movement.

David M. Jahnke has been teaching social studies in Harford County Public Schools since 2001 and was named 2013 US History Teacher of the Year by the Daughters of the American Revolution for Maryland.  He represented Harford County on the Maryland State Department of Education task force in partnership with the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of African American History during its tenure. Mr. Jahnke graduated with a major in history and a minor in English from the Virginia Military Institute, where he was named a George C. Marshall Undergraduate Scholar. He received his Masters of Arts in Teaching from Notre Dame of Maryland University. 

Dr. James Karmel is Professor of History at Harford Community College in Bel Air, Maryland. He previously chaired the Oral History Association’s Education Committee, has directed numerous oral history projects with students, and conducted many oral history interviews himself. Key projects include the “Thirty Years, Thirty Voices” project about the casino era for the Atlantic City Free Public Library and the “Harford Voices” project about the 1960s with Harford students. Currently, Dr. Karmel is Director of the Harford Civil Rights Project to document the 20th Century African American civil rights movement in Harford County, Maryland, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

Registration

Registration for the Oral History in the Classroom workshop entire Introduction to Oral History Workshop is $15. For an additional $35 (total of $50), registrants will also have full participation in the OHA Annual Meeting, October 19-24. Regular OHA Annual Meeting registration is $75.

Register Here: oha.memberclicks.net/local-workshop-oral-history-classroom.

To register, you will have to either sign in or create an account on MemberClicks. Creating an account does not mean you are signing up to be a member of the organization, and you will only ever receive communications regarding the events for which you register.